Amateur Radio Station at SCaLE

Wednesday, 8. March 2017

Amateur Radio Station at SCaLE (So Cal Linux Expo)

Several Amateur Radio Operators setup and operated an HF station at the Pasadena Convention Center for a 3 day stretch at the premier Open Source Software event in the US. The event included a booth on the expo floor demonstrating Mesh Networking, as well as a VE testing session for new and upgrading operators. This was the second year that SCaLE invited this group of Amateur Radio Operators to show the latest (and not so latest) technologies used to communicate with other Amateur Operators around the world. I was lucky enough to be invited to participate in the HF station this year by Vern (W6NCT) as an operator and also to man the information table next to the station.

Who Comes To An Open Source Conference?

That’s a great question! If you think it’s a bunch of programmers that spend all their waking hours locked away in dark rooms, typing endlessly on keyboards, eating junk food and downing highly caffeinated beverages, you would only be partially right. The far greater majority of attendees are programmers, engineers and technologists that make their living using or creating open source software. There are also many computer hobbyists and even some younger folks that have a love of technology. In other words, A PERFECT AUDIENCE TO INTRODUCE TO AMATEUR RADIO!

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Logical Repair Practices

Tuesday, 29. May 2012

My God, can it all be the same?

Seems like most of my job now a days is looking at large systems and isolating problem areas. Things like performance problems, data corruption, or even failure analysis. Many of these systems have several independently managed processes, all tied together in a single forward facing application. Over the years, I’ve developed some methods of approaching system failures and problems that gives me a better chance of quickly evaluating and repairing the issues that plague these systems. I used to believe that these methods were only valid on larger system models, then, one day, a colleague of mine and I were sitting in a small coffee house discussing a problem they were having with one of the desktops they manage. While we exchanged ideas, I suddenly realized that I was using the same mental process on this little desktop as I did with the large cluster systems.

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Open Source Groupware – SOGo

Monday, 1. August 2011

Open Source Groupware – The Clear Leader is SOGo:

Some of the early groups of articles I penned on this blog, were comparisons of Open Source Groupware projects. At that time, the only one I could really recommend was eGroupware. Although I still believe eGroupware is a valid contender for your Groupware server, I have discovered a project, that in my opinion is leaps and bounds ahead of the pack. The project is called SOGo.

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Setting Up Native IPv6 Connectivity, A Network Operators Overview.

Friday, 2. July 2010

Setting up IPv6 connectivity.

Back in December `09, my company ACT USA, began testing IPv6. These tests quickly advanced to our production environment. Over the last six months, I have been in the process of setting up native IPv6 connectivity for all our data centers. This connectivity is based on the dual stack model. This article attempts to cover the technology available, and the choices I made based on that technology.

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The Technology of SCALE8x – A Post Event Review. PART – 2

Friday, 12. March 2010

The Technology of SCALE8x – A Post Event Review. PART – 2

This is the second installment all about the technologies used for SCALE8x. The first installment dealt with the services that the technology group has setup and maintains for the event year round. This installment will cover the pre-show setup that went into the technologies that were used at the show.

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The Technology of SCALE8x – A Post Event Review. PART – 1

Monday, 22. February 2010

The Technology of SCALE8x – A Post Event Review. PART – 1

Every February in Los Angeles CA, a group of dedicated volunteers get together to put on what many believe to be the largest all volunteer organized open source technology conventions in the US. This three day event features talks and exhibits specifically targeted at Open Source users, programmers, and system administrators.

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S.C.A.L.E is Coming! Feb. 19-21!

Tuesday, 16. February 2010

S.C.A.L.E is coming! Feb. 19-21!

Sorry to take so long between posts… But I’ve been kinda busy getting ready for The So. Cal Linux Expo, coming up in Los Angeles February 19th through the 21st. This is the premier open source show on the west coast! I’ll be there as the network architect this year, with Mike Maki taking over my position as Tech Committee Chairperson.

This year, we are pushing the envelope by adding IPv6 connectivity network wide. As near as we all can gather, this makes us the first show of this type to provide a dual stack network show wide!

If you are in to opensource, or getting pressure to reduce your IT costs, come enjoy the show! A quick sumary:

  • Over 80 exhibitor booths
  • Over 100 talks and presentations
  • B.O.F. events
  • Gatherings and Fun & Games

See their web page for details http://www.socallinuxexpo.org.

Come be a part!

Hope to see you there.

— Stu

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Adventures in IPv6

Monday, 11. January 2010

Adventures in IPv6… Or how I spent my Xmas Vacation!

Whether you are a network administrator, an end user, or someone that falls in between, you are going to be hearing a lot about IPv6 in the coming years. If you’re in the business of delivering network services, then you need to get up to speed on this… Because before you know it, you will have a client or end user come up to you with a problem that IPv6 is involved in.

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Ubuntu Releases 9.10 – Karmic Koala. An Initial Review.

Friday, 30. October 2009

Ubuntu 9.10. A first look…

Officially released on the 29th, Karmic Koala is burning up Internet bandwidth, as every Linux user rushes to download the new OS. I’ve only had a few hours to play with it, but all and all I like what I see. The developers have really put a lot into meeting the goals they set for themselves.

If you are a current Ubuntu user, you will notice some very slight changes in the user experience. Most of what went into this release is under the hood. Things like reducing bootup time and improving hardware configuration interfaces really take center stage.

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Microsoft Submits Drivers For Linux Kernel.

Tuesday, 21. July 2009

Microsoft submits thousands of lines of code for inclusion in the Linux Kernel.

Yep, you’re not seeing things. On July 20, 2009 at OSCON, Microsoft announced their submission of three drivers to the Linux kernel. These drivers are licensed under the GPL2, and according to the group that handles such submissions, they have met all criteria for the drivers to be excepted in to the main line kernel.

At first glance, it would appear that all that screaming and jumping around that Ballmer is famous for managed to cause him to burst a blood vessel in his brain, but after reading the stories surrounding the submission, it turns out that this is no act of charity by Microsoft.

Why would Microsoft want to help Linux?

The short answer here is that they aren’t helping Linux, they are submitting code that’s sole goal is to make Linux run better under the Microsoft Virtualization platform. The drivers submitted are to allow Linux to work with Microsoft’s hypervisor. This will give Microsoft an advantage over competing virtualization platforms such as VMWare.

So, if this will give Microsoft an advantage, why would Linux except the code?

Most of the people I know, are asking why the kernel project would even consider accepting the code? Well, because Microsoft played by the open source rules, that’s why. Unlike Microsoft, the open source community sets guidelines to protect from discrimination. Unlike corporate models that favor certain groups over others when it comes to code or driver submission, most open source projects have a more down to earth approach. Check out what the rules are for submitting drivers to the Linux kernel, and you’ll understand why.

So, even though Microsoft’s intentions are not what I would consider angelic, as long as they meet the requirements for inclusion, they get to play on our field as well.

— Stu

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